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RESOLV's ADVENT CALENDAR

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RUHR EXPLORES SOLVATION SCIENCE

RUHR EXPLORES SOLVATION SCIENCE

We shape a new scientific discipline, inspire the scientists of tomorrow, and enable future technologies

WHAT is RESOLV?

The Cluster of Excellence RESOLV is an interdisciplinary research project of the Ruhr University Bochum and the TU Dortmund University, as well as four other institutions in the German Ruhr area. Since 2012, about 200 scientists cooperate to clarify how the solvent is involved in the control, mediation and regulation of chemical reactions. Our research is essential to advance technologies that could reuse CO2 for chemicals production, increase the efficiency of energy conversion and storage and develop smart sensors. RESOLV is funded by the German Federal Government and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia with 42 Mio. EUR over the period 2019-2025. 

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Therapy approach for Huntington’s disease

Rubin Magazine: Computer simulations and experiments with cells have yielded promising results.

Involuntary movements are a prominent symptom of Huntington’s disease. The hereditary disease develops slowly at first, but sooner or later severely impacts those affected and ultimately leads to death. An effective drug does not yet exist.

Researchers from RUB and the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE) have now discovered a potential therapy approach. The cause of Huntington’s disease is a defect in the huntingtin gene, in which a certain gene sequence occurs repeatedly – too many repetitions trigger the disease. The huntingtin gene contains the blueprint for the protein of the same name. Abnormal huntingtin proteins clump together, and these aggregates have a toxic effect.

Positive effects on cell cultures

UDE researchers Prof Dr Thomas Schrader and Prof Dr Frank-Gerrit Klärner have developed a synthetic molecule that has the potential to become an effective drug. In simulations, Prof Dr Elsa Sánchez-García, also at UDE, showed that the molecule can prevent the clumping of huntingtin. In cooperation with the Bochum-based biochemist Prof Dr Simon Ebbinghaus, she examined the substance in more detail.

It was effective not just in simulations. The substance also reduced the number of abnormal huntingtin aggregates in experiments with living cells. Bochum-based physicians at the St. Josefs Hospital have shown that positive effects on cell cultures are also detectable. The researchers now want to investigate the mode of action in more detail and explore the potential as a drug further.

The teams in Bochum and Duisburg-Essen collaborate within the Cluster of Excellence “Ruhr explores Solvation”.

Read this article and more in Rubin

------------------

Original publication

Tobias Vöpel et al.: Inhibition of Huntingtin Exon-1 Aggregation by the Molecular Tweezer CLR01, in: Journal of the Americal Chemical Society, 2017, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.6b11039

 

 

Posted on

Therapy approach for Huntington’s disease

Rubin Magazine: Computer simulations and experiments with cells have yielded promising results.

Involuntary movements are a prominent symptom of Huntington’s disease. The hereditary disease develops slowly at first, but sooner or later severely impacts those affected and ultimately leads to death. An effective drug does not yet exist.

Researchers from RUB and the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE) have now discovered a potential therapy approach. The cause of Huntington’s disease is a defect in the huntingtin gene, in which a certain gene sequence occurs repeatedly – too many repetitions trigger the disease. The huntingtin gene contains the blueprint for the protein of the same name. Abnormal huntingtin proteins clump together, and these aggregates have a toxic effect.

Positive effects on cell cultures

UDE researchers Prof Dr Thomas Schrader and Prof Dr Frank-Gerrit Klärner have developed a synthetic molecule that has the potential to become an effective drug. In simulations, Prof Dr Elsa Sánchez-García, also at UDE, showed that the molecule can prevent the clumping of huntingtin. In cooperation with the Bochum-based biochemist Prof Dr Simon Ebbinghaus, she examined the substance in more detail.

It was effective not just in simulations. The substance also reduced the number of abnormal huntingtin aggregates in experiments with living cells. Bochum-based physicians at the St. Josefs Hospital have shown that positive effects on cell cultures are also detectable. The researchers now want to investigate the mode of action in more detail and explore the potential as a drug further.

The teams in Bochum and Duisburg-Essen collaborate within the Cluster of Excellence “Ruhr explores Solvation”.

Read this article and more in Rubin

------------------

Original publication

Tobias Vöpel et al.: Inhibition of Huntingtin Exon-1 Aggregation by the Molecular Tweezer CLR01, in: Journal of the Americal Chemical Society, 2017, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.6b11039

 

 

Our scientific fields

Research Area I

Local Solvent Fluctuations in Heterogeneous Systems

 

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Research Area II

Solvent Control of Chemical Dynamics and Reactivity

 

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Research Area III

Solvation under Extreme Conditions

 

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Video: The solvent of life

Water. It’s the most abundant substance on Earth´s surface and in our bodies. But is water a passive spectator in the animated scene of bio-chemical reactions inside our cells? RESOLV scientists investigate the important role that water plays in the most diverse processes, bringing solvation science into the spotlight.

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Posted on

Therapy approach for Huntington’s disease

Rubin Magazine: Computer simulations and experiments with cells have yielded promising results.

Involuntary movements are a prominent symptom of Huntington’s disease. The hereditary disease develops slowly at first, but sooner or later severely impacts those affected and ultimately leads to death. An effective drug does not yet exist.

Researchers from RUB and the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE) have now discovered a potential therapy approach. The cause of Huntington’s disease is a defect in the huntingtin gene, in which a certain gene sequence occurs repeatedly – too many repetitions trigger the disease. The huntingtin gene contains the blueprint for the protein of the same name. Abnormal huntingtin proteins clump together, and these aggregates have a toxic effect.

Positive effects on cell cultures

UDE researchers Prof Dr Thomas Schrader and Prof Dr Frank-Gerrit Klärner have developed a synthetic molecule that has the potential to become an effective drug. In simulations, Prof Dr Elsa Sánchez-García, also at UDE, showed that the molecule can prevent the clumping of huntingtin. In cooperation with the Bochum-based biochemist Prof Dr Simon Ebbinghaus, she examined the substance in more detail.

It was effective not just in simulations. The substance also reduced the number of abnormal huntingtin aggregates in experiments with living cells. Bochum-based physicians at the St. Josefs Hospital have shown that positive effects on cell cultures are also detectable. The researchers now want to investigate the mode of action in more detail and explore the potential as a drug further.

The teams in Bochum and Duisburg-Essen collaborate within the Cluster of Excellence “Ruhr explores Solvation”.

Read this article and more in Rubin

------------------

Original publication

Tobias Vöpel et al.: Inhibition of Huntingtin Exon-1 Aggregation by the Molecular Tweezer CLR01, in: Journal of the Americal Chemical Society, 2017, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.6b11039

 

 

igss summer school

The integrated Graduate School Solvation Science hosts an annual Summer School at the Ruhr University Bochum. The school always takes place during Whitsuntide and is an integral part of the GSS students' training during their doctoral studies. This year's iGSS Summer School took place from the 11th to the 14th of June, 2019.

International speakers, suggested by the students themselves, are invited to give keynote talks on their research in the field of Solvation Science. The Advanced Laboratory Modules give the students an excellent opportunity to learn new and interesting experimental and theoretical techniques within a specific research topic of their own choice. 

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Publications highlight

R Schwan, C Qu, D Mani, N Pal L van der Meer, B Redlich, C Leforestier, JM Bowman, G Schwaab, M Havenith
Observation of the Low-Frequency Spectrum of the Water Dimer as a Sensitive Test of the Water Dimer Potential and Dipole Moment Surfaces, Angew. Chem. 58 (2019), DOI: 10.1002/anie.201906048

N Berger, LJB Wollny, P Sokkar, S Mittal, J Mieres-Perez, R Stoll, W Sander, E Sanchez-Garcia
Solvent-Enhanced Conformational Flexibility of Cyclic Tetrapeptides, ChemPhysChem 20 (2019), 1664, DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201900345

A El Arrassi, Z Liu, MV Evers, N Blanc, G Bendt, S Saddeler, D Tetzlaff, D Pohl, C Damm, S Schulz, K Tschulik
Intrinsic Activity of Oxygen Evolution Catalysts Probed at Single CoFe2O4 Nanoparticles, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 141 (2019), 9197, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b04516

D Mani, R Pérez de Tudela, R Schwan, N Pal, S Körning, H Forbert, B Redlich, AFG van der Meer, G Schwaab, D Marx, M Havenith
Acid solvation versus dissociation at “stardust conditions”: Reaction sequence matters, Science Advances  5 (2019), eaav8179, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav8179

CAJ Hutter, MH Timachi, LM Hürlimann, I Zimmermann, P Egloff, H Göddeke, S Kucher, S Štefanic, M Karttunen, LV Schäfer, E Bordignon, MA Seeger
The extracellular gate shapes the energy profile of an ABC exporter, Nature Communications 10 (2019), 2260, DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-09892-6

 

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