How acids behave in interstellar space

How acids behave in interstellar space

NEWS HIGHLIGHT: Acids in water release protons, but how do they behave in interstellar space?

PATHWAYS FOR WOMEN IN STEM

PATHWAYS FOR WOMEN IN STEM

How it went: The MUST/RESOLV gender and science meeting (9-10 September 2019).

RUHR EXPLORES SOLVATION SCIENCE

RUHR EXPLORES SOLVATION SCIENCE

We shape a new scientific discipline, inspire the scientists of tomorrow, and enable future technologies

WE ARE RESOLV

WE ARE RESOLV

Over 200 scientists from about 50 research groups in 6 institutions

ZEMOS: Home of Solvation Science @RUB

ZEMOS: Home of Solvation Science @RUB

The first research building for Solvation Science in the world. Hosts over 100 scientists, it's home to 6 disciplines.

WHAT is RESOLV?

The Cluster of Excellence RESOLV is an interdisciplinary research project of the Ruhr University Bochum and the TU Dortmund University, as well as four other institutions in the German Ruhr area. Since 2012, about 200 scientists cooperate to clarify how the solvent is involved in the control, mediation and regulation of chemical reactions. Our research is essential to advance technologies that could reuse CO2 for chemicals production, increase the efficiency of energy conversion and storage and develop smart sensors. RESOLV is funded by the German Federal Government and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia with 42 Mio. EUR over the period 2019-2025. 

Find out more

Quick links

FACTS &
FIGURES

GRADUATE
SCHOOL

GENDER
EQUALITY

International
network

TECHNOLOGY
TRANSFER

Latest News or browse all

Posted on
In this shielded cell, Abdelilah El Arrassi is testing the nanoparticles in electrochemical experiments. © RUB, Kramer
The Bochum research team: Kristina Tschulik, Abdelilah El Arrassi, Niclas Blanc, Mathies Evers and Zhibin Liu (from left) © RUB, Kramer

High reaction rates even without precious metals

JACS: Precious metals are often efficient catalysts. But they are expensive and rare. However, it has so far been difficult to determine how efficient non-precious metal alternatives are. (German version below the English one)

Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production. However, it is often difficult to determine what reaction rates they can achieve, especially when it comes to oxide particles. This is because the particles must be attached to the electrode using a binder and conductive additives, which distort the results. With the aid of electrochemical analyses of individual particles, researchers have now succeeded in determining the activity and substance conversion of nanocatalysts made from cobalt iron oxide - without any binders. The team led by Professor Kristina Tschulik from RUB reports together with colleagues from the University of Duisburg-Essen and from Dresden in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, published online on 30 May 2019.

It is essential to find out more about the activities of nanocatalysts.- Kristina Tschulik


“The development of non-precious metal catalysts plays a decisive role in realising the energy transition as only they are cheap and available in sufficient quantities to produce the required amounts of renewable fuels,” says Kristina Tschulik, a member of the Cluster of Excellence Ruhr Explores Solvation (RESOLV). “It is essential to find out more about the activities of nanocatalysts in order to be able to efficiently further develop non-precious metal catalysts.”

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Detailed press release

Original Publication: Abdelilah El Arrassi, Zhibin Liu, Mathies V. Evers, Niclas Blanc, Georg Bendt, Sascha Saddeler, David Tetzlaff, Darius Pohl, Christine Damm, Stephan Schulz and Kristina Tschulik: Intrinsic activity of oxygen evolution catalysts probed at single CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, in: Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2019, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b04516

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hohe Reaktionsraten auch ohne Edelmetalle


JACS: Edelmetalle sind oft effiziente Katalysatoren. Aber sie sind teuer und selten. Wie effizient edelmetallfreie Alternativen sind, ist bislang jedoch schwer zu bestimmen.

Edelmetallfreie Nanopartikel könnten eines Tages teure Katalysatoren für die Wasserstoffproduktion ersetzen. Welche Reaktionsraten sie erreichen können, ist allerdings oft schwer zu bestimmen, insbesondere wenn es sich um Oxidpartikel handelt. Denn die Partikel müssen mit einem Bindemittel und leitfähigen Zusätzen an der Elektrode befestigt werden, was die Ergebnisse verzerrt. Mithilfe elektrochemischer Analysen einzelner Partikel ist es Forscherinnen und Forschern nun gelungen, die Aktivität und den Stoffumsatz von Nanokatalysatoren aus Cobalt-Eisenoxid zu bestimmen – und zwar ohne Bindemittel. Das Team um Prof. Dr. Kristina Tschulik von der RUB berichtet gemeinsam mit Kolleginnen und Kollegen von der Universität Duisburg-Essen und aus Dresden im Journal of the American Chemical Society, online veröffentlicht am 30. Mai 2019.

Mehr über die Aktivitäten von Nanokatalysatoren zu erfahren ist unabdingbar.

– Kristina Tschulik


„Die Entwicklung edelmetallfreier Katalysatoren spielt bei der Realisierung der Energiewende eine entscheidende Rolle, da nur sie kostengünstig und zahlreich genug verfügbar sind, um erneuerbare Brennstoffe in der benötigten Menge zu produzieren“, sagt Kristina Tschulik, Mitglied im Exzellenzcluster Ruhr Explores Solvation, kurz RESOLV. „Mehr über die Aktivitäten von Nanokatalysatoren zu erfahren ist unabdingbar, um edelmetallfreie Katalysatoren effizient weiterentwickeln zu können.“

 

ZUSÄTZLICHE INFormation

Ausführliche Presseinformation

Originalveröffentlichung: Abdelilah El Arrassi, Zhibin Liu, Mathies V. Evers, Niclas Blanc, Georg Bendt, Sascha Saddeler, David Tetzlaff, Darius Pohl, Christine Damm, Stephan Schulz and Kristina Tschulik: Intrinsic activity of oxygen evolution catalysts probed at single CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, in: Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2019, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b04516

Posted on
In this shielded cell, Abdelilah El Arrassi is testing the nanoparticles in electrochemical experiments. © RUB, Kramer
The Bochum research team: Kristina Tschulik, Abdelilah El Arrassi, Niclas Blanc, Mathies Evers and Zhibin Liu (from left) © RUB, Kramer

High reaction rates even without precious metals

JACS: Precious metals are often efficient catalysts. But they are expensive and rare. However, it has so far been difficult to determine how efficient non-precious metal alternatives are. (German version below the English one)

Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production. However, it is often difficult to determine what reaction rates they can achieve, especially when it comes to oxide particles. This is because the particles must be attached to the electrode using a binder and conductive additives, which distort the results. With the aid of electrochemical analyses of individual particles, researchers have now succeeded in determining the activity and substance conversion of nanocatalysts made from cobalt iron oxide - without any binders. The team led by Professor Kristina Tschulik from RUB reports together with colleagues from the University of Duisburg-Essen and from Dresden in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, published online on 30 May 2019.

It is essential to find out more about the activities of nanocatalysts.- Kristina Tschulik


“The development of non-precious metal catalysts plays a decisive role in realising the energy transition as only they are cheap and available in sufficient quantities to produce the required amounts of renewable fuels,” says Kristina Tschulik, a member of the Cluster of Excellence Ruhr Explores Solvation (RESOLV). “It is essential to find out more about the activities of nanocatalysts in order to be able to efficiently further develop non-precious metal catalysts.”

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Detailed press release

Original Publication: Abdelilah El Arrassi, Zhibin Liu, Mathies V. Evers, Niclas Blanc, Georg Bendt, Sascha Saddeler, David Tetzlaff, Darius Pohl, Christine Damm, Stephan Schulz and Kristina Tschulik: Intrinsic activity of oxygen evolution catalysts probed at single CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, in: Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2019, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b04516

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hohe Reaktionsraten auch ohne Edelmetalle


JACS: Edelmetalle sind oft effiziente Katalysatoren. Aber sie sind teuer und selten. Wie effizient edelmetallfreie Alternativen sind, ist bislang jedoch schwer zu bestimmen.

Edelmetallfreie Nanopartikel könnten eines Tages teure Katalysatoren für die Wasserstoffproduktion ersetzen. Welche Reaktionsraten sie erreichen können, ist allerdings oft schwer zu bestimmen, insbesondere wenn es sich um Oxidpartikel handelt. Denn die Partikel müssen mit einem Bindemittel und leitfähigen Zusätzen an der Elektrode befestigt werden, was die Ergebnisse verzerrt. Mithilfe elektrochemischer Analysen einzelner Partikel ist es Forscherinnen und Forschern nun gelungen, die Aktivität und den Stoffumsatz von Nanokatalysatoren aus Cobalt-Eisenoxid zu bestimmen – und zwar ohne Bindemittel. Das Team um Prof. Dr. Kristina Tschulik von der RUB berichtet gemeinsam mit Kolleginnen und Kollegen von der Universität Duisburg-Essen und aus Dresden im Journal of the American Chemical Society, online veröffentlicht am 30. Mai 2019.

Mehr über die Aktivitäten von Nanokatalysatoren zu erfahren ist unabdingbar.

– Kristina Tschulik


„Die Entwicklung edelmetallfreier Katalysatoren spielt bei der Realisierung der Energiewende eine entscheidende Rolle, da nur sie kostengünstig und zahlreich genug verfügbar sind, um erneuerbare Brennstoffe in der benötigten Menge zu produzieren“, sagt Kristina Tschulik, Mitglied im Exzellenzcluster Ruhr Explores Solvation, kurz RESOLV. „Mehr über die Aktivitäten von Nanokatalysatoren zu erfahren ist unabdingbar, um edelmetallfreie Katalysatoren effizient weiterentwickeln zu können.“

 

ZUSÄTZLICHE INFormation

Ausführliche Presseinformation

Originalveröffentlichung: Abdelilah El Arrassi, Zhibin Liu, Mathies V. Evers, Niclas Blanc, Georg Bendt, Sascha Saddeler, David Tetzlaff, Darius Pohl, Christine Damm, Stephan Schulz and Kristina Tschulik: Intrinsic activity of oxygen evolution catalysts probed at single CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, in: Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2019, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b04516

Our scientific fields

Research Area I

Local Solvent Fluctuations in Heterogeneous Systems

 

Read more

Research Area II

Solvent Control of Chemical Dynamics and Reactivity

 

Read more

Research Area III

Solvation under Extreme Conditions

 

Read more

Video: The solvent of life

Water. It’s the most abundant substance on Earth´s surface and in our bodies. But is water a passive spectator in the animated scene of bio-chemical reactions inside our cells? RESOLV scientists investigate the important role that water plays in the most diverse processes, bringing solvation science into the spotlight.

More videos from RESOLV 

Upcoming Events or browse all

Posted on
In this shielded cell, Abdelilah El Arrassi is testing the nanoparticles in electrochemical experiments. © RUB, Kramer
The Bochum research team: Kristina Tschulik, Abdelilah El Arrassi, Niclas Blanc, Mathies Evers and Zhibin Liu (from left) © RUB, Kramer

High reaction rates even without precious metals

JACS: Precious metals are often efficient catalysts. But they are expensive and rare. However, it has so far been difficult to determine how efficient non-precious metal alternatives are. (German version below the English one)

Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production. However, it is often difficult to determine what reaction rates they can achieve, especially when it comes to oxide particles. This is because the particles must be attached to the electrode using a binder and conductive additives, which distort the results. With the aid of electrochemical analyses of individual particles, researchers have now succeeded in determining the activity and substance conversion of nanocatalysts made from cobalt iron oxide - without any binders. The team led by Professor Kristina Tschulik from RUB reports together with colleagues from the University of Duisburg-Essen and from Dresden in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, published online on 30 May 2019.

It is essential to find out more about the activities of nanocatalysts.- Kristina Tschulik


“The development of non-precious metal catalysts plays a decisive role in realising the energy transition as only they are cheap and available in sufficient quantities to produce the required amounts of renewable fuels,” says Kristina Tschulik, a member of the Cluster of Excellence Ruhr Explores Solvation (RESOLV). “It is essential to find out more about the activities of nanocatalysts in order to be able to efficiently further develop non-precious metal catalysts.”

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Detailed press release

Original Publication: Abdelilah El Arrassi, Zhibin Liu, Mathies V. Evers, Niclas Blanc, Georg Bendt, Sascha Saddeler, David Tetzlaff, Darius Pohl, Christine Damm, Stephan Schulz and Kristina Tschulik: Intrinsic activity of oxygen evolution catalysts probed at single CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, in: Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2019, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b04516

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hohe Reaktionsraten auch ohne Edelmetalle


JACS: Edelmetalle sind oft effiziente Katalysatoren. Aber sie sind teuer und selten. Wie effizient edelmetallfreie Alternativen sind, ist bislang jedoch schwer zu bestimmen.

Edelmetallfreie Nanopartikel könnten eines Tages teure Katalysatoren für die Wasserstoffproduktion ersetzen. Welche Reaktionsraten sie erreichen können, ist allerdings oft schwer zu bestimmen, insbesondere wenn es sich um Oxidpartikel handelt. Denn die Partikel müssen mit einem Bindemittel und leitfähigen Zusätzen an der Elektrode befestigt werden, was die Ergebnisse verzerrt. Mithilfe elektrochemischer Analysen einzelner Partikel ist es Forscherinnen und Forschern nun gelungen, die Aktivität und den Stoffumsatz von Nanokatalysatoren aus Cobalt-Eisenoxid zu bestimmen – und zwar ohne Bindemittel. Das Team um Prof. Dr. Kristina Tschulik von der RUB berichtet gemeinsam mit Kolleginnen und Kollegen von der Universität Duisburg-Essen und aus Dresden im Journal of the American Chemical Society, online veröffentlicht am 30. Mai 2019.

Mehr über die Aktivitäten von Nanokatalysatoren zu erfahren ist unabdingbar.

– Kristina Tschulik


„Die Entwicklung edelmetallfreier Katalysatoren spielt bei der Realisierung der Energiewende eine entscheidende Rolle, da nur sie kostengünstig und zahlreich genug verfügbar sind, um erneuerbare Brennstoffe in der benötigten Menge zu produzieren“, sagt Kristina Tschulik, Mitglied im Exzellenzcluster Ruhr Explores Solvation, kurz RESOLV. „Mehr über die Aktivitäten von Nanokatalysatoren zu erfahren ist unabdingbar, um edelmetallfreie Katalysatoren effizient weiterentwickeln zu können.“

 

ZUSÄTZLICHE INFormation

Ausführliche Presseinformation

Originalveröffentlichung: Abdelilah El Arrassi, Zhibin Liu, Mathies V. Evers, Niclas Blanc, Georg Bendt, Sascha Saddeler, David Tetzlaff, Darius Pohl, Christine Damm, Stephan Schulz and Kristina Tschulik: Intrinsic activity of oxygen evolution catalysts probed at single CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, in: Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2019, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b04516

igss summer school

The integrated Graduate School Solvation Science hosts an annual Summer School at the Ruhr University Bochum. The school always takes place during Whitsuntide and is an integral part of the GSS students' training during their doctoral studies. This year's iGSS Summer School took place from the 11th to the 14th of June, 2019.

International speakers, suggested by the students themselves, are invited to give keynote talks on their research in the field of Solvation Science. The Advanced Laboratory Modules give the students an excellent opportunity to learn new and interesting experimental and theoretical techniques within a specific research topic of their own choice. 

Find out more

Publications highlight

R Schwan, C Qu, D Mani, N Pal L van der Meer, B Redlich, C Leforestier, JM Bowman, G Schwaab, M Havenith
Observation of the Low-Frequency Spectrum of the Water Dimer as a Sensitive Test of the Water Dimer Potential and Dipole Moment Surfaces, Angew. Chem. 58 (2019), DOI: 10.1002/anie.201906048

N Berger, LJB Wollny, P Sokkar, S Mittal, J Mieres-Perez, R Stoll, W Sander, E Sanchez-Garcia
Solvent-Enhanced Conformational Flexibility of Cyclic Tetrapeptides, ChemPhysChem 20 (2019), 1664, DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201900345

A El Arrassi, Z Liu, MV Evers, N Blanc, G Bendt, S Saddeler, D Tetzlaff, D Pohl, C Damm, S Schulz, K Tschulik
Intrinsic Activity of Oxygen Evolution Catalysts Probed at Single CoFe2O4 Nanoparticles, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 141 (2019), 9197, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b04516

D Mani, R Pérez de Tudela, R Schwan, N Pal, S Körning, H Forbert, B Redlich, AFG van der Meer, G Schwaab, D Marx, M Havenith
Acid solvation versus dissociation at “stardust conditions”: Reaction sequence matters, Science Advances  5 (2019), eaav8179, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav8179

CAJ Hutter, MH Timachi, LM Hürlimann, I Zimmermann, P Egloff, H Göddeke, S Kucher, S Štefanic, M Karttunen, LV Schäfer, E Bordignon, MA Seeger
The extracellular gate shapes the energy profile of an ABC exporter, Nature Communications 10 (2019), 2260, DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-09892-6

 

find out more