Next step: From excellent science to innovative start-ups

Next step: From excellent science to innovative start-ups

NEWS HIGHLIGHT: Chemistry 4.0: The incubator for start-ups in chemistry “Start4Chem” kicks-off.

PATHWAYS FOR WOMEN IN STEM

PATHWAYS FOR WOMEN IN STEM

How it went: The MUST/RESOLV gender and science meeting (9-10 September 2019).

RUHR EXPLORES SOLVATION SCIENCE

RUHR EXPLORES SOLVATION SCIENCE

We shape a new scientific discipline, inspire the scientists of tomorrow, and enable future technologies

WE ARE RESOLV

WE ARE RESOLV

Over 200 scientists from about 50 research groups in 6 institutions

ZEMOS: Home of Solvation Science @RUB

ZEMOS: Home of Solvation Science @RUB

The first research building for Solvation Science in the world. Hosts over 100 scientists, it's home to 6 disciplines.

WHAT is RESOLV?

The Cluster of Excellence RESOLV is an interdisciplinary research project of the Ruhr University Bochum and the TU Dortmund University, as well as four other institutions in the German Ruhr area. Since 2012, about 200 scientists cooperate to clarify how the solvent is involved in the control, mediation and regulation of chemical reactions. Our research is essential to advance technologies that could reuse CO2 for chemicals production, increase the efficiency of energy conversion and storage and develop smart sensors. RESOLV is funded by the German Federal Government and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia with 42 Mio. EUR over the period 2019-2025. 

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Lukas Gooßen and Stefania Trita are working on procedures that are supposed to make the production of chemical substances cheaper and more environmentally friendly. © RUB, Marquard

Creating complex molecules in just a few steps

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.: This process could make the synthesis of drugs and other substances easier, more environmentally friendly and cheaper.

Researchers have found a way to convert single bonds between carbon and hydrogen atoms in a chemical molecule into carbon-carbon bonds. This so-called C-H activation is considered a promising strategy for producing complex molecules from simple starting materials in just a few steps.

As there are many bonds between carbon and hydrogen atoms in every molecule, it is difficult to convert a particular individual bond. This is exactly what a team led by Prof Dr Lukas Gooßen and Stefania Trita from the RUB have now achieved. They report the results in the renowned journal “Angewandte Chemie”.

Was considered impossible

Bonds between carbon and hydrogen are very stable and are reluctant to undergo chemical reactions. “For that reason, it had long been considered impossible to transform these bonds into functional groups”, explains Lukas Gooßen, a member of the Cluster of Excellence Resolv. “We hope that one day the process will enable complex pharmaceutical chemicals and substances required in agriculture to be produced in fewer steps than before and in a more energy-efficient, environmentally friendly and cost-effective manner.”

In the current study, the chemists also showed that the choice of solvent is crucial. Unlike with common solvents, they achieved a much greater yield of the desired product with trichloroethanol.

Original Publication:

S. Trita, A. Biafora, M. Pichette-Drapeau, P. Weber, L. J. Goossen, Regiospecific ortho-C-H Allylation of Benzoic Acids, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018

DOI: 10.1002/anie.201712520

 

Detailed press release in RUB news

Posted on
Lukas Gooßen and Stefania Trita are working on procedures that are supposed to make the production of chemical substances cheaper and more environmentally friendly. © RUB, Marquard

Creating complex molecules in just a few steps

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.: This process could make the synthesis of drugs and other substances easier, more environmentally friendly and cheaper.

Researchers have found a way to convert single bonds between carbon and hydrogen atoms in a chemical molecule into carbon-carbon bonds. This so-called C-H activation is considered a promising strategy for producing complex molecules from simple starting materials in just a few steps.

As there are many bonds between carbon and hydrogen atoms in every molecule, it is difficult to convert a particular individual bond. This is exactly what a team led by Prof Dr Lukas Gooßen and Stefania Trita from the RUB have now achieved. They report the results in the renowned journal “Angewandte Chemie”.

Was considered impossible

Bonds between carbon and hydrogen are very stable and are reluctant to undergo chemical reactions. “For that reason, it had long been considered impossible to transform these bonds into functional groups”, explains Lukas Gooßen, a member of the Cluster of Excellence Resolv. “We hope that one day the process will enable complex pharmaceutical chemicals and substances required in agriculture to be produced in fewer steps than before and in a more energy-efficient, environmentally friendly and cost-effective manner.”

In the current study, the chemists also showed that the choice of solvent is crucial. Unlike with common solvents, they achieved a much greater yield of the desired product with trichloroethanol.

Original Publication:

S. Trita, A. Biafora, M. Pichette-Drapeau, P. Weber, L. J. Goossen, Regiospecific ortho-C-H Allylation of Benzoic Acids, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018

DOI: 10.1002/anie.201712520

 

Detailed press release in RUB news

Our scientific fields

Research Area I

Local Solvent Fluctuations in Heterogeneous Systems

 

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Research Area II

Solvent Control of Chemical Dynamics and Reactivity

 

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Research Area III

Solvation under Extreme Conditions

 

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Video: The solvent of life

Water. It’s the most abundant substance on Earth´s surface and in our bodies. But is water a passive spectator in the animated scene of bio-chemical reactions inside our cells? RESOLV scientists investigate the important role that water plays in the most diverse processes, bringing solvation science into the spotlight.

More videos from RESOLV 

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Posted on
Lukas Gooßen and Stefania Trita are working on procedures that are supposed to make the production of chemical substances cheaper and more environmentally friendly. © RUB, Marquard

Creating complex molecules in just a few steps

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.: This process could make the synthesis of drugs and other substances easier, more environmentally friendly and cheaper.

Researchers have found a way to convert single bonds between carbon and hydrogen atoms in a chemical molecule into carbon-carbon bonds. This so-called C-H activation is considered a promising strategy for producing complex molecules from simple starting materials in just a few steps.

As there are many bonds between carbon and hydrogen atoms in every molecule, it is difficult to convert a particular individual bond. This is exactly what a team led by Prof Dr Lukas Gooßen and Stefania Trita from the RUB have now achieved. They report the results in the renowned journal “Angewandte Chemie”.

Was considered impossible

Bonds between carbon and hydrogen are very stable and are reluctant to undergo chemical reactions. “For that reason, it had long been considered impossible to transform these bonds into functional groups”, explains Lukas Gooßen, a member of the Cluster of Excellence Resolv. “We hope that one day the process will enable complex pharmaceutical chemicals and substances required in agriculture to be produced in fewer steps than before and in a more energy-efficient, environmentally friendly and cost-effective manner.”

In the current study, the chemists also showed that the choice of solvent is crucial. Unlike with common solvents, they achieved a much greater yield of the desired product with trichloroethanol.

Original Publication:

S. Trita, A. Biafora, M. Pichette-Drapeau, P. Weber, L. J. Goossen, Regiospecific ortho-C-H Allylation of Benzoic Acids, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018

DOI: 10.1002/anie.201712520

 

Detailed press release in RUB news

igss summer school

The integrated Graduate School Solvation Science hosts an annual Summer School at the Ruhr University Bochum. The school always takes place during Whitsuntide and is an integral part of the GSS students' training during their doctoral studies. This year's iGSS Summer School took place from the 11th to the 14th of June, 2019.

International speakers, suggested by the students themselves, are invited to give keynote talks on their research in the field of Solvation Science. The Advanced Laboratory Modules give the students an excellent opportunity to learn new and interesting experimental and theoretical techniques within a specific research topic of their own choice. 

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Publications highlight

R Schwan, C Qu, D Mani, N Pal L van der Meer, B Redlich, C Leforestier, JM Bowman, G Schwaab, M Havenith
Observation of the Low-Frequency Spectrum of the Water Dimer as a Sensitive Test of the Water Dimer Potential and Dipole Moment Surfaces, Angew. Chem. 58 (2019), DOI: 10.1002/anie.201906048

N Berger, LJB Wollny, P Sokkar, S Mittal, J Mieres-Perez, R Stoll, W Sander, E Sanchez-Garcia
Solvent-Enhanced Conformational Flexibility of Cyclic Tetrapeptides, ChemPhysChem 20 (2019), 1664, DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201900345

A El Arrassi, Z Liu, MV Evers, N Blanc, G Bendt, S Saddeler, D Tetzlaff, D Pohl, C Damm, S Schulz, K Tschulik
Intrinsic Activity of Oxygen Evolution Catalysts Probed at Single CoFe2O4 Nanoparticles, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 141 (2019), 9197, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b04516

D Mani, R Pérez de Tudela, R Schwan, N Pal, S Körning, H Forbert, B Redlich, AFG van der Meer, G Schwaab, D Marx, M Havenith
Acid solvation versus dissociation at “stardust conditions”: Reaction sequence matters, Science Advances  5 (2019), eaav8179, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav8179

CAJ Hutter, MH Timachi, LM Hürlimann, I Zimmermann, P Egloff, H Göddeke, S Kucher, S Štefanic, M Karttunen, LV Schäfer, E Bordignon, MA Seeger
The extracellular gate shapes the energy profile of an ABC exporter, Nature Communications 10 (2019), 2260, DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-09892-6

 

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